Lodgepole pines after a forest fire

A few weeks ago I visited the site of the 1988 Red Bench Fire on the western edge of Glacier National Park. In an area about 15 miles north of Polebridge I came across the are in this image where the old burned out trunks of the previous forest are still standing as the new growth of Lodgepole pines form a thick bed of new growth below. This is the growth 24 years after the fire which burned in 1988. The new trees range in height from 4 - 10 feet.

15 comments:

  1. what a waste if the trunks are left to rot. someone should harvest them, think how many tipis could be erected .

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  3. At This Time you could not harvest those trees, they are probably infested with Termites, but this happen 24 years ago. in today's world those trees do get harvested for timbers depending of the size of the tree, and how burnt they are.

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  4. This is awesome post. All pine picture so beautiful. Thank yor for everything.

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  6. Interesting articles, greeting from Belgium

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  7. wow that is some length of time to be a dead standing stick. genuinely cannot get my head around all those sticks still remaining. Interesting

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  8. This photo was not taken in the Red Bench Fire area of 1988, but in the Wedge Canyon Fire area from 2003. Unthinned stands average 3-5 feet in height, thinned stands are 6 to 8 feet tall or more.

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  11. Amazing pictures, absolutely cool to see the old trees with new ones growing around them!

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